Scientists find solution to climate change issues in $100, 000 Nigeria Prize for Science

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TWENTY-nine scientists will vie to find long-lasting solutions to erosions, droughts and desertification plaguing different parts of the country in the 2019 edition of The Nigeria Prize for Science sponsored by Nigeria LNG Limited, NLNG.

The science prize, first awarded in 2004and now in its 15th year, comes with a cash prize of $100, 000.

Details on the 2019 prize contest were revealed earlier on Tuesday, May 14 during the handover of the 2019 entries to the Advisory Board of the prize.  This activity signifies the beginning of the judging process which will culminate in the announcement of a winner.

While handing over the entries to the Advisory Board, chaired by Alfred Akpoveta Susu, Andy Odeh, the NLNG’s corporate communications and public affairs manager, said: “The business of scientific innovation and research is not an easy task anywhere in the world. In Nigeria, it is even more difficult because of the paucity of research funds and the resulting increasing lack of interest.”

He stated further that Nigeria LNG will continue through the Nigeria Prize for Science to find excellence even if it is to be found “in the darkest corner” as NLNG is committed to changing the narrative of the nation through scientific prowess, through which many nations have excelled.

Odeh pointed out that although Climate Change remains a myth to so many people, its impact can be seen on our environment and agriculture. “We have all seen the growing rate of desertification in the northern part of our country, he said, adding “Climate Change is real and that is why NLNGbelieves that solutions to this threat can be engendered through a competition such as The Nigeria Prize for Science. The prize is another opportunity for NLNG to contribute to the development of the country.

“The Nigeria Prize is open to all irrespective of nationality. What is common to all past and prospective winners is the focus on solving Nigeria’s problems through scientific endeavours. It does not matter who finds solutions to the Nigerian problems.”

Odeh said further: “All that counts is that it helps to build a better Nigeria, in line with the vision of Nigeria LNG”.

The entries, which came in response to a call for entries published in the national dailies in February 2019, will be examined on their merits of excellence in advancing the frontiers of knowledge in or providing innovative solutions to the issue of climate change in Nigeria.

Receiving the entries on behalf of the Advisory Board, Professor Susu, remarked that regardless of the large or how small the number of entries is, the judging process for the competition must take its course and assured Nigerians that the advisory board will deliver according to their mandate which is based on the values of integrity and excellence. He enjoined the judges to understand that “judging the prize goes beyond the prize itself. It is contributing to nation building and we must never compromise on excellence.”

The entries were immediately handed over to the panel of judges, chaired by Deborah Ajakaiye. In her remarks, she assured Nigerians that the judges were completely aligned to NLNG’s core values of Integrity and Excellence in carrying out their duties. She added that finding solutions to climate change through the prize is timely as there are forces fast eating up the land mass from all corners of the country.

Ajakaiye is the first female Physics professor in Nigeria.  She was the first Black African to be awarded a Lifetime Honorary Fellowship of the Geological Society of London, England for her singular research work on the origin and evolution of the Younger Granites of Northern Nigeria. Over her career, she has lectured on Earth Science related topics at University of Manitoba, Canada, and some Nigerian universities.

Other members of the panel are Peter Nnabude and Abdullahi Emmanuel Bala. Nnabude is a professor of Soil Science and Land Resources Management at Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State. Some of his achievements include the development of post-tillage soil management techniques for rural farmers and the development of rice mill waste utilisation for soil and water management. Bala is a professor in the department of Geology, Federal University Lokoja, Lokoja. His achievements include research in the hydrogeology of the basement complex of Nigeria and application of Landsat_5 Tm data to natural resources investigation.

On the prize’s Advisory Board are Michael Adikwu, the vice-chancellor, University of Abuja and also a past winner of the science prize; Elijah Mshelia, a nuclear physicist; Barth Nnaji, a renowned scientist and former minister of Power; and Nike Akande, two-time minister and president, Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the country’s premier chamber of commerce.

The first winner for the Nigeria Prize for Science was Akpoveta Susu and his then doctoral student, Kingsley Abhulimen. In 2005, there was no winner. Michael Adikwu won the prize in 2006. In 2007, as in 2005, there was no winner. However, in 2008, Ebenezer Meshida emerged winner.

Andrew Nok and Akii Ibhadode won the prize in 2009 and 2010 respectively. There was no winner until 2017 when the prize was jointly awarded to three entries by Ikeoluwapo Ajayi; Ayodele Jegede; Bidemi Yusuf; Olugbenga Mokuolu and Chukwuma Agubata. In 2018, Peter Ngenewas awarded the Science Prize, for his work in ’Innovation in Electric Power.’

– May 15, 2019 @ 17:29 GMT |

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